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Who are the Fastest-Scoring (and Most Tenacious) Batsmen in Test Cricket? Click Here.

 

 

Longer articles by Charles Davis Click Here

 

 

Unusual Records. For Cricket Records you will not see anywhere else, Click Here

 

 

a list of “Unusual Dismissals” in Test matches

 

 

 

 

 

  

 2019 and Earlier Entries

 

A Bonus Page:

some remarkable first-class innings, re-scored.

 

Link to Travels

 

The Davis Test Match Database Online.

 

Detailed scores for all Tests from 1877 to the1990s have now been posted. Almost three-quarters of Tests include ball-by-ball coverage; virtually all others offer some degree of extended detail, beyond anything previously made available online. 

The starting page is here. An information page outlining this database is here.

Major Test Partnerships (200+) 1877 to 1970.           Major Test Partnerships (200+) 1971 to 1999. 

 

 

I came across a 1982 newspaper article by Bill O’Reilly. He was talking about his early recollections of cricket broadcasting on television, which he had first seen in 1938 in England. The match was Middlesex v Australians on 30th May 1938 (O’Reilly says it was the 28th, but that day was rained out). This is before the Tests that year, and must represent one of the very first cricket TV broadcasts.

 

The television set (super-expensive in those days) was on loan to the hotel where the Australians were staying. Most curiously, O’Reilly said he was in the team playing that day, but he had stayed behind in the hotel to deal with some correspondence! He had expected the team to bat all day, but they started losing wickets. O’Reilly could see from the broadcast that the pitch was dodgy, so he hurried down to the ground, and was just in time to bat and make a duck.

 

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I took a look at the question of a bowler taking a wicket with his last ball of a Test and first ball of his next, and found only 25 cases (from the database covering about 85% of Tests). Waqar Younis and Richard Hadlee did it twice.

 

The low number might seem surprising when you consider that there are well over one thousand cases of wickets with consecutive balls in general play, but remember that there is never more than one opportunity per Test match for a bowler to do take two in two in different Tests (and usually no chance at all), whereas the same bowler may well have multiple opportunities for two wickets in two balls during the course of  a Test match.

 

There are no known cases of three in three across two Tests (a quasi-hat-trick) except for the extraordinary case of George Lohmann, who took a hat-trick to finish a match in 1895-96, and then a wicket with his first ball of the next Test, to secure four wickets in four balls (he made it five in six two balls later).

 

Overall, the chances of taking a wicket with a hat-trick ball are only 1 in 30, so, given the low incidence of two in two balls across two matches, it is not surprising that three in three is so rare.

 

There is an interesting case of Mervyn Dillon, whose last two balls at Port of Spain in 2002 were a run out and a wicket (in two different overs), followed by a wicket with his next ball at Bridgetown.

 

Waqar Younis extended one of his wicket pairs to three wickets in four balls; Rashid Khan of Afghanistan has done the same, and that was across his first two Test matches (9 months apart).

 

 

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1 November 2021

 

 

The Test Match Database Online has reached a crossover point with the Cricinfo Ball-by-Ball Archive texts. Beginning with the 1998-99 India v Pakistan series in January 1999, Cricinfo began to archive their bbb logs. I am fairly certain, from memory, that they were doing some ball-by-ball descriptions of internationals before that – the earliest record goes back to the 1996 World Cup final – but for some reason they never preserved them (sad emoji). If I have checked correctly, the only Test that we have from Cricinfo, from that period, is a single day from the 1997 India series in West Indies.

 

The early Cricinfo texts were typed commentaries and were not designed as rigorous scores; there are gaps and anomalies. Where necessary (and possible) these have been adjusted with reference to surviving scores or other published information. In a few cases, such as the final day of the Asian Test Championship Final in Dhaka 1999, the gaps and problems are substantial, and there is no detailed backup. In such cases, I have ‘recreated’ a bbb version that is consistent with surviving scores and reports. These cases are few and I hope I will be forgiven for doing this for the sake of completeness.

 

There are actually six Tests from the early period that are missing entirely from Cricinfo, five of them from New Zealand; I have managed to obtain alternative scores for all of these and so maintain continuity of the ball-by-ball record.

 

I have also obtained alternative scores for a significant number of other 21st Century Tests, but this collection is not comprehensive. Of the first 100 Tests from the ‘Cricinfo era’ starting in 1999, there are 36 Tests where I rely entirely on Cricinfo for bbb records.

 

The archived Cricinfo texts gradually improved in detail and reliability, especially after 2002.

 

It would be wonderful if someone at Cricinfo could unearth some ancient backup tapes from 1997 and 1998 and find some more bbb logs. 1998 is not so essential as I have all the Test matches from that year already (some ODIs are missing), but there are considerable gaps in my data for 1997. I understand that there has been a search of this kind, sadly without success.

 

I am not sure how far into this new era that my online work will go. But I have been at this for nine years now and I don’t really know how to stop.

 

 

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The Kolkata Test of February 1999 at Eden Gardens is one of only seven Tests that Pakistan has played at that cavernous venue. The match quite possibly attracted the highest attendance of any Test match; however, the numbers were never accurately counted. I am told that the ground had 90,462 seats at the time, so any numbers in excess of that must have been standing room only. The available numbers are estimates, and it must be said that the estimates vary widely.

 

I have collected (with assistance from others) some mentions of crowd numbers from reports at the time, illustrating the variations in estimates…

 

 

Day 1

Wisden 100,000

Dawn 80,000

Electronic Telegraph 85,000

Times ~95,000

Day 2

Dawn 80,000

Wisden 100,000

First 3 days

Electronic Telegraph 270,000

Times “approaching 100,000 per day”

Wisden Cricket Monthly “nigh on 90,000 for the first three days”

Day 4

Times of India 90,000

Electronic Telegraph 95,000

Wisden 100,000

Day 5

Electronic Telegraph “nearly 50,000”.

Wisden 65,000

Times 50,000

South China Morning Post 55,000

Whole match

Wisden Cricket Monthly “about 400,000”

Wisden 465,000

 

 

 

Ironically, the last overs of the match were bowled in a virtually empty stadium, following a roughhouse clearing out of the final day crowd by police, in response to serious unrest that suspended play for three hours and 20 minutes. There had also been serious unrest on Day 4.

 

Even though it appeared in Wisden, I consider the estimate of 465,000 to be highly improbable. A figure around 400,000 seems a reasonable compromise from the conflicting numbers. This number is in the same ballpark (if I may use the expression) as the estimate of 395,000 for the Test against Australia at the same Ground in 2001, and the 390,000 estimate from 1981-82. I don’t have figures for Tests at Eden Gardens after 2002, but it has been apparent that Test attendances have been declining in India, even though interest remains substantial. At the same time, Indian authorities have been distributing Test matches among a wider range of smaller venues, and Kolkata has hosted only 12 Tests in 22 years since the match in question.

 

The largest accurately measured total attendance for a Test remains the 350,534 over six days at the MCG back in 1937. The most for a five-day Test is 271,854 for the MCG Boxing Day Test in 2013-14 (including a ground-high 91,062 on the first day), and the highest average daily attendance is 81,450 for the equivalent match in 2006-07, which only lasted three days.

 

 

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16 October 2021

 

I don’t think I have discussed before, on this blog, the origins of the early Test match “canon”, that is, the list of matches regarded as official Tests.

 

It is widely held that the originator of the list was a South Australian journalist named Clarence P. Moody. Beyond that, it remains a bit of a mystery how Moody’s list, drawn up in the 1890s, became accepted as gospel. With limited debate, and no input from English sources, it has become set in stone, so to speak. Moody was something of a cricket statistician. He was also a friend of George Giffen, who may well have suggested the creation of the list. However, there was never any official imprimatur on Moody’s work.

 

I went looking for Moody’s original list. Various printed sources and online articles said that it came from Moody’s 1898 book on South Australian Cricket. I managed to borrow, from Roger Page, a facsimile copy of this book (originals are rare and valuable) and was rather surprised to find that it contained no such list. However, an Introduction to that facsimile edition pointed me to an earlier (1894) Moody work, Australian Cricketers 1856-1893-94. Fortunately, the Trove Archive has this book online, and there can be found the original list, on pages 80 and 81.

 

Clarence Moody’s 1894 list of Test matches

 

One noteworthy aspect is that Moody restricted himself to England v Australia Test matches. In that respect, the list is indeed identical to the accepted canon, but there are several other matches, played in South Africa in 1888-89 and 1891-92, that are not included. So how did those Tests get into official lists? I don’t know but I would like to find out. (I am told that the South Africa matches were listed as Tests by Ashley-Cooper in a Cricketer Annual in 1930-31, but I don’t know if there are earlier references.)

 

I do know that there has been plenty of doubt and dispute over the Test status of some matches, and also some matches that did not make the list but might have. In the case of 1888-89, even the first-class status can be questioned, since there was no first-class cricket in South Africa at the time, and a number of the Englishmen were themselves not first-class cricketers. (A favourite stat: JEP McMaster played Test cricket, but was out to the only ball he ever faced in first-class cricket.) In his 1951 collection of Test match scores (The Playfair Book of Test Cricket), Roy Webber certainly expressed a sceptical view, but he also said that “little purpose seems to be served by omitting ‘doubtful’ matches”. I agree, but I think that caveats need always to be expressed when records from those matches crop up (such as Briggs 15 wickets for 28 at Cape Town, 14 of them clean bowled).

 

A comment from the Sydney Sportsman in 1901 seems pertinent here…

 

 

moody1

 

 

It should be said that Moody’s list did not require deep scholarship. Once the matches of 1877 are accepted into Test cricket, most of the rest falls into place. However, the fact that the list came to be used as a reference, in the face of the disagreements expressed above, makes it important.

 

I won’t go into the detail of the claims of certain matches for Test status. But here are a couple of observations:

 

- The touring English team in 1884-85 did not regard the first two matches, now regarded as Tests, as authentic. As far as they were concerned there were three Tests in the series. The canon lists five.

 

- The 1887-88 match was by no means regarded as a proper Test match even in Sydney. The Sydney Morning Herald described the Australians as the "non-representative Australian XI".

 

 

********

 

An Earlier Wagon Wheel

 

I have written (somewhere) that the first known batting Wagon Wheels were found in Test match reports in the Daily Express in 1905. Sreeram has now pushed the date back a little further, finding similar diagrams in Manchester Guardian reports for the first Test of that series (innings by Hill and Tyldesley). Unfortunately, the Guardian reports do not say how the diagrams were made or by whom, although they do claim copyright. The Express does suggest that theirs were drawn up in the newspaper office, based on information telegraphed or telephoned from the ground.

 

It has been claimed/reported that Wagon Wheels were invented by Bill Ferguson, who in 1905 was the Australian scorer, making his first of many tours. However, the diagrams in the British papers are different in style to Ferguson’s, with concentric circles for each run value. No actual Ferguson-style Wagon Wheels earlier than 1911 have been sighted.

 

In his autobiography, Ferguson provides a whole range of examples of his Wagon Wheels, but he is curiously vague about their development. The earliest diagram in that book is from 1912 (he didn’t call them “Wagon Wheels” by the way; I wonder when the term originated).

 

Sreeram has added further evidence by finding another 1905 Guardian Wagon Wheel, this time from a county match, Lancashire v Yorkshire in June (Tyldesley 134). It even names the bowlers for each shot.

 

 

 

 

Ferguson at this time was elsewhere scoring for the Australian team, so could not have contributed to this. I think that it is now fair to say that Ferguson adopted, rather than invented, the idea of a Wagon Wheel.

The Guardian’s Wagon Wheels continued in 1906 but then appear to stop. There is a Wagon Wheel from 1907 for Gilbert Jessop’s 93, reproduced in Brodribb’s The Croucher, and as I have noted earlier, it was taken up in Australia in 1907-08, albeit in a different style again.

 

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In the Test match at The Oval, Rohit Sharma (127) was dismissed by the first ball with the new ball, after a partnership of 153 with Pujara. This is the second highest partnership ended by a brand new ball, after a partnership of 172 between Mark Richardson and Stephen Fleming at Colombo PSS in 2003.(where known)

 

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Something curious about cricket watching in Sri Lanka…during England’s Test match in Colombo in 1992-93, the attendance on the Saturday was only about 1,000. On the same weekend, two interschool matches in Colombo attracted crowds of over 10,000.

(source: Sunday Times)

 

********

 

Here is a neat little stat. When West Australian Des Hoare batted for the first time on debut at Adelaide in 1961, his first ball was from Lance Gibbs, who had just completed the hat-trick.

As far as I can see, Hoare is the only batsman in Test history whose first ball in Tests was the first ball after a hat-trick (the double hat-trick ball). Others on debut have come in after a hat-trick, but it was either the second innings, or they didn't face the double hat-trick ball. One case was CA Absolom in 1878-79, who came in after Spofforth took a hat-trick, but the hat-trick came off the last three balls of an over, and Absolom faced a ball in the next over, before Spofforth bowled again.


It was Hoare's only Test.

 

********

 

Longest sequence of missed chances off a bowler without a catch being taken (data since 2003)...

 

In 2019, Joe Root had a sequence of seven chances missed off his bowling, without any catches being taken, spread over three Tests. Same thing happened to Nathan Hauritz in 2010, again over multiple Tests.

 

********

 

It hadn't occurred to me until a question on Ask Steven, but I found that never before had a team, behind on first innings, declared its second innings after lunch on the 5th day, and won. This is what India did to England at Lord's.

 

********

 

The most threes in a Test career were hit by Steve Waugh (397) and Ricky Ponting (381). The top six positions are held by Australians who were active (at least in part) during the 1990s, before the much-lamented ‘shrinking’ of the grounds and the advent of Super Bats. Mark Taylor hit 354 threes or 14.1% of his runs; this is the highest percentage of any major batsman.

 

Threes have always been more common on the larger Australian grounds. The top 13 positions are held by Australian or English batsmen.

 

******

 

16 September 2021

 

I have been working on a list of “Unusual Dismissals” in Test matches. This is largely drawn from notes that I have made over the years in my study of Test matches and scorebooks, rather than specific research. Some of the instances have been thanks to suggestions by others.

 

The stimulus to finally put this together was the dismissal of Nauman Ali at Harare earlier this year, stumped by Chakabva off a wide. As far as I know, this was unprecedented in Test matches, although it happens from time to time in limited overs games.

 

Any suggestions for additions would be welcome. The general criteria include: a dismissal must have occurred, and there must have been something very unusual about the dismissal itself, not just the situation (for instance, run out for 99 is not included unless there was something strange about the dismissal). Also excluded is where one fielder drops a catch and deflects to another: there are actually many examples of this in Tests. Bowlers deflecting a shot to effect a run out is also excluded, unless it was a dropped catch.

 

 

********

 

While checking through the list of most overs in a day by individual bowlers, I noticed again the absence of any modern names. The list is effectively set in stone, and is dominated by Tests where over rates were high and days lasted six hours. Most instances came from the 1940s and early 1950s, when some captains, rather lacking in imagination, would put spin bowlers on and just keep them bowling. This certainly applied to John Goddard of the West Indies.

 

So I have prepared a separate list for Tests since 1998.

 

Most Overs in a Day: individual bowlers since 1998.

Overs

Bowler

Day

47

M Muralitharan

SL v Zim (3), Galle 2001/02

3

46

M Muralitharan

SL v Eng (2), Kandy 2003/04

5

45

RW Price

Zim v SAf (2), Bulawayo (Queen's) 2001/02

4

45

DL Vettori

NZ v Ban (2), Chittagong (Aziz) 2004/05

3

42

SK Warne

Aus v SAf (2), Cape Town 2001/02

3

42

M Muralitharan

SL v Eng (2), Birmingham (Edgbaston) 2002

2

41

DL Vettori

NZ v Aus (3), Perth (WACA) 2001/02

5

41

RA Jadeja

Ind v Aus (3), Ranchi (Jharkand) 2016/17

5

40

M Muralitharan

SL v WI (1), Galle 2001/02

1

40

A Kumble

Ind v Aus (4), Sydney (SCG) 2003/04

5

40

A Kumble

Ind v WI (2), St Lucia (Beausejour) 2006

5

Incomplete overs counted as one

 

There are ten cases of 39 overs. Even in this list, the near absence of instances in the last ten years is notable, with just one appearance, by Jadeja. There are only three instances from the last ten years in the Top 30. By contrast, Muralitharan appears ten times in the Top 30, and even then his Tests before 1998 are not included.

 

There are worrying signs that over rates are on the way down again. It has become unusual for teams get through 90 overs in the allotted six hours, often not even in the allowed extension to 6.5 hours. The great majority of innings in Tests this year have recorded over rates of 80 balls per hour or less (40 out of the last 46 innings). In the 1960s, rates of more than 100 balls per hour were commonplace; in the 1940s and earlier, it was 120 balls per hour or more.

 

Fielding sides are mostly to blame, but not entirely. Batsmen nowadays often go through elaborate preparations and are quite frequently not ready to face when a bowler is trying to get through an over more quickly than usual.

 

 

********

 

There has been a general checking and updating of various records in the “Unusual Records” section. Not everything has been checked, but those sections that have been checked have been appropriately labelled with a date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A scoring curiosity: in the second Test between Zimbabwe and New Zealand at Harare in 1997-98, it appears that when no balls were scored from, an extra run was added (for example, a no ball hit for four added five runs to the total). This was not the established protocol at the time: the practice came into general use about a year later. There were no instances in the first Test of that series (none of the no balls were scored from), but there were several instances in the second Test.

 

The change became permanent in Test #1424, Pakistan v Aus, Oct 1998.

 

In the Zim Test, it is particularly interesting in that the match was very close. In the final innings, the 8th wicket fell with 4 balls left and 11 to win. At that point the tailenders decided not to go for victory and played out the four balls. But if the scoring protocol had been normal for that time, the target would actually have been 8 runs (and 7 to tie), not 11. I wonder: perhaps they would have had a go at that.

 

 

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From time to time a batsman scores a century on the first day of a Test even though his team batted second. Bowlers have also been known to take five or more wickets on the first day, bowling second, but it has become rather rare in these days of covered wickets and slow over rates. The most recent case is Glenn McGrath at Lord’s in 2005. After Australia was out for 190, McGrath took five wickets for two runs from his 4th to 9th overs, immediately following tea. He finished the day with 5 for 21.

 

 

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Fred Price was a wicketkeeper from Middlesex who played one Test in 1938. He played 402 first-class matches without ever bowling, the all-time record for a complete career.

 

Kumar Sangakkara played 529 List A games (and also 267 T20) without bowling. However, he bowled in f-c cricket.

 

T20: Eoin Morgan has played 333 T20s to date without bowling.

 

Combined totals: Steven Davies, who has played for England and various counties, has played 581 games (240 f-c, 188 List A, and 153 T20) without bowling. He bowled one over in an Under-19 Test. He is still active.

 

 

 

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17 August 2021

 

In response to an enquiry, I put together a list of bowlers who have bowled underarm in Tests.

 

Gerald Brodribb actually wrote a book on underarm bowling.  I don’t have a copy, but there is a surprising amount of stuff on ‘lob’ bowling on the internet (Cricket Country and elsewhere) that is probably derived from Brodribb, at least in part. I have scoured this and come up with the following (some is from notes in my database). Most of these were bowling lobs, and the underarm part is presumed. Hornby is an exception, bowling "grubbers".

 

Underarm bowlers in Tests

 

T Armitage Eng v Aus (1), Melbourne (MCG) 1876/77

AN Hornby Eng v Aus (1), Melbourne (MCG) 1878/79

WW Read Eng v Aus (1), Melbourne (MCG) 1882/83

WW Read Eng v Aus (3), The Oval 1884

A Lyttleton Aus v Eng (3), The Oval 1884

G Ulyett Eng v Aus (2), Melbourne (MCG) 1884/85 one ball only

AE Stoddart Eng v Aus (4), Melbourne (MCG) 1897/98

GHT Simpson-Hayward Eng v SAf 1909/10 Five Tests

 

Simpson-Hayward is regarded as the last of the regular lob bowlers.

 

 

Test players recorded as bowling underarm in first-class cricket but not in Tests

 

For the most part, these players did so only once, or on rare occasions.

 

EM Grace

SMJ Woods

CB Fry

R Spooner

GF Vernon

LCH Palairet

RH Spooner

EG Wynyard

JM Blackham

H Verity

JB Iverson

JM Brearley

CF Root

G Brown

Yuvraj of Patiala

 

 

Dilip Vengsarkar is said to have bowled an over of lobs for West Zone against the MCC in 1984-85. However, these appear to have been ‘donkey drops’, not underarm.

 

I read also the Hornby was also ambidextrous with regard to bowling. Apart from him, I have not seen any references to bowling ‘grubbers’ (as opposed to lobs) in Tests.

 

 

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Dismissal Frequency by Ball of Over

 

Is there any pattern to dismissals according to which ball of an over is being bowled? I decided to have another look at this. For all dismissals in Tests from 2003 to 2020, the numbers are

 

Ball #

Wkts

1

3776

2

3965

3

4055

4

3910

5

4033

6

3988

 

 

This distribution is largely random. There is a slight shortage of dismissals on Ball #1, which seems to be associated with a pattern in tail-end dismissals. There is an excess of 8th-10th wicket dismissals toward the end of an over, perhaps because of failed strike-farming attempts.

 

For the first seven wickets, where the innings continued after the dismissal, the numbers are

 

Ball #

Wkts

%

1

2833

16.2%

2

2927

16.7%

3

3048

17.4%

4

2873

16.4%

5

2923

16.7%

6

2881

16.5%

 

This is a fairly random set of numbers. None of these numbers is even 1 percentage point away from the mean of 16.67%.

 

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13 July 2021

 

 

I have updated the Hot 100 list – the fastest-scoring Test batsmen. It’s been a couple of years since the last update.

 

Most batsmen tend to score at a characteristic rate which varies less, over time, than batting average. The upshot is that the list changes only gradually, apart from new players making an appearance, so it doesn’t matter too much if updates are infrequent.

 

It is interesting though that David Warner, still very prominent in the list, has been ‘calming down’ to some extent in recent years. He sometimes plays defensively now (only sometimes). His career scoring rate as of 2019 was 74.5; this has now dropped to 72.7. His scoring rate in the interim has been 62.5 runs per 100 balls, and that includes his triple-century against Pakistan.

 

The full lists are at the usual link. I have also prepared the list below, restricted to fully-recognised batsmen, just to see how the list looks without the lower-middle-order all-rounders and wicketkeepers who are prominent on the full list. The list is filtered simply by restricting to batsmen with an average batting position of less than 6.1. (All innings for such batsmen were included, even below #6 position, as long as the career average position was 6.1). The runs qualification has been raised to 2000 career runs for modern batsmen, although it remains at 1000 runs for earlier times.

 

Given these qualifications, Virender Sehwag’s lead becomes very striking indeed. Shahid Afridi was faster still as a top-order player, but his Test record is rather patchy and he never reached 2000 runs.

 

Fastest-scoring Test batsmen: ‘recognised’ batsmen

 

Career

Career Runs

Career Average

Runs/ 100 balls

1. V Sehwag (Ind)

2001-2013

8586

49.3

82.2

2. DA Warner (Aus)

2011-

7311

48.1

72.7

3. JH Sinclair (SA)

1896-1911

1069

23.2

72.1

4. IVA Richards (Sri)

1974-1991

8540

50.2

69.0

5. VT Trumper (Aus)

1899-1912

3163

39.0

67.1

6. S Dhawan (Ind)

2013-

2315

40.6

66.9

7. TM Dilshan (Sri)

1999-2013

5492

41.0

65.5

8. ST Jayasuriya (Sri)

1991-2007

6973

40.1

65.2

9. K Srikkanth (Ind)

1981-1992

2062

29.9

65.1

10. BB McCullum (NZ)

2004-2016

6453

38.6

64.6

11. SM Patil (Ind)

1980-1984

1588

36.9

63.6

12. KP Pietersen (Eng)

2005-2014

8181

47.3

61.7

13. Shakib Al Hasan (Ban)

2007-

3930

39.7

61.7

14. SJ McCabe (Aus)

1930-1938

2748

48.2

61.5

15. DG Bradman (Aus)

1928-1948

6996

99.9

61.0

16. FE Woolley (Eng)

1909-1934

3283

36.1

60.7

17. BC Lara (WI)

1990-2006

11953

52.9

60.5

18. Habibul Bashar (Ban)

2000-2008

3026

30.9

60.3

19. CH Gayle (WI)

2000-2014

7215

42.2

60.3

20. ML Hayden (Aus)

1994-2009

8625

50.7

60.1

21. GC Smith (SA)

2002-2014

9265

48.3

59.7

22. LRPL Taylor (NZ)

2007-

7564

45.8

59.6

23. CH Lloyd (Sri)

1966-1985

7515

46.7

59.5

24. LRD Mendis (Sri)

1982-1988

1329

31.6

59.3

25. FM Engineer (Ind)

1961-1975

2611

31.1

58.9

26. EdeC Weekes (Sri)

1948-1958

4455

58.6

58.7

27. RT Ponting (Aus)

1995-2012

13378

51.9

58.7

28. VG Kambli (Ind)

1993-1995

1084

54.2

58.6

29. C Hill (Aus)

1896-1912

3412

39.2

58.5

30. AL Logie (Sri)

1983-1991

2470

35.8

58.5

31. RG Sharma (Ind)

2013-

2679

46.2

57.9

32. Tamim Iqbal (Ban)

2008-

4788

39.6

57.8

33. CG Macartney (Aus)

1907-1926

2131

41.8

57.7

34. RA McLean (SA)

1951-1964

2120

30.3

57.4

35. M Azharuddin (Ind)

1985-2000

6215

45.0

57.4

36. DW Hookes (Aus)

1977-1985

1306

34.4

57.3

37. V Kohli (Ind)

2011-

7547

52.0

56.9

38. KL Rahul (Ind)

2014-

2006

34.6

56.5

39. DM de Silva (Sri)

2016-

2253

37.6

56.5

40. Babar Azam (Pak)

2016-

2169

42.5

56.4

41. Mohammad Hafeez (Pak)

2003-

3652

37.6

56.0

42. MJ Clarke (Aus)

2004-2015

8643

49.1

55.9

43. RG Pollock (SA)

1963-1970

2256

61.0

55.8

44. Saeed Anwar (Pak)

1990-2001

4052

45.5

55.8

45. RA Duff (Aus)

1902-1905

1317

35.6

55.8

46. Aamir Sohail (Pak)

1992-2000

2823

35.3

55.6

47. BKG Mendis (Sri)

2015-

3022

34.7

55.1

48. SPD Smith (Aus)

2010-

7540

61.8

55.1

49. Zaheer Abbas (Pak)

1969-1985

5062

44.8

55.1

50. CD McMillan (NZ)

1997-2005

3116

38.5

54.9

 

 

A modified version of this list, with adjustment for changes in runs-scoring standards over time, is available at the link. This particular list has not been updated since 2019.

 

 

During a tour of Sri Lanka in 1996, Alistair Campbell and Henry Olonga of Zimbabwe were swept out to sea while swimming, and had to be rescued by lifeguards. The incident was reminiscent of a rescue during the rest day of the Bridgetown Test of 1977, when Pakistan players Zaheer Abbas and Wasim Bari were rescued from drowning while attempting to swim back to their hotel from a raft that had drifted out to sea.

 

 

********

21 June 2021

 

 

Well it’s been a while since anything was posted. Put that down to other work coming in (non-cricket) and general lassitude. It might not be a reasonable response, but the effect of all these crushing lockdowns has been to discourage rather than encourage me.

 

Nevertheless, Test matches are still being posted in my database – well into 1996 now. I have been making minor (but painstaking) corrections to some older data too, mostly in the session-by-session and ball-by-ball files, which did not always line up precisely, particularly for inter-War Tests. Thanks to Glenn Timmins for pointing out the problems.

 

Anyway. Here are a few items…

 

 

Players making the greatest number of different scores, from 0 to 100, in all Internationals combined. It is not surprising that Tendulkar leads here, but he never made scores of 58 or 75. A pity then that he was out for 74 in his last Test; he had already made that score three times. He also made two 76s late in his career.

 

Tendulkar did make scores of 58 and 75 in first-class cricket, although he never made 99 or 102, and a few other scores below 90, including 87. He did make those scores in List A. If my search is correct, the lowest score (f-c and List A combined) that Tendulkar never made is 129, followed closely by 130.

 

 

SR Tendulkar

99

JH Kallis

97

RT Ponting

97

Inzamam-ul-Haq

96

KC Sangakkara

96

RS Dravid

96

 

********

 

Batsmen who faced 100 balls in a Test innings – highest career percentages.

 

H Sutcliffe 58.3% of innings

B Mitchell 52.5%

WM Woodfull 51.9%

DG Bradman 50.0%

IR Redpath 50.0%

L Hutton 50.0%

KF Barrington 49.2%

EAB Rowan 48.0%

G Boycott 45.6%

GM Turner 45.2%

RS Dravid 45.1%

(minimum 50 innings; some estimates – a limited number – are necessary for older data)

 

********

 

Some stats on 20 (+) run overs in Tests.

 

There have been 178 known instances of which 27 were in 8-ball overs.

 

Of the 178, 96 occurred in this century.

 

Of the 178, 118 included an individual batsman making 20 or more runs. In the others the runs were shared or there were extras to make up the 20.

 

Bowlers conceding 20 in an over... four times for JR Thomson and MJ Hoggard. Two of Thomson's were 8-ball overs. Three times by Swann, M Morkel, Boje, Willis and Sobers (Willis and Sobers include 8-ball overs)

 

Batsmen hitting 20 runs in an over: Gilchrist 6 times, Lara and Botham 3. Thirteen batsmen have done it twice. Botham and Lara were also in one additional over each worth 20 or more runs, although they did not themselves score 20. David Warner has batted in four 20+ overs, although he has scored 20 runs only once himself.

 

 

********

 

 

Here are some percentages for 'No Play' days in Tests, by country. Days can be lost for a variety of reasons but mostly weather. Abandoned matches not included, but all other Tests are.

 

Ireland 20.0% (1 match only)

Bangladesh 5.6%

New Zealand 4.8%

England 4.2%

India 3.2%

Sri Lanka 3.0%

South Africa 2.7%

Zimbabwe 2.2%

Australia 2.0%

Pakistan 2.2%

West Indies 1.9%

UAE 0.6% (1 day lost, following death of PJ Hughes)

 

********

 

 

Although he was selected as an opening batsman, Roger Twose did not get to bat until the fifth day of his second Test match. His debut at Chennai in 1995 was washed out with only 2 sessions of play, and New Zealand did not bat. The following Test at Cuttack was similarly afflicted, and New Zealand did not bat until the morning of the fifth day.

 

 

********

 

I have mentioned before that when Garry Sobers hit the record-breaking record-equalling run in his 365 not out at Kingston in 1958, Hanif Mohammad had switched from bowling right-handed to bowling left-handed. Also interesting to note is that Hanif bowled left-handed in the first Test of that series at Bridgetown, after his epic 337 as the match petered out into a draw. He was credited with bowling on a ‘good length’ but did not take a wicket.

 

 

********

 

 

 

 

28 April 2021

 

Musical Cricket

 

I had an unusual 'cricket' experience recently. I went to a concert by a classical trio (piano, violin, cello) who call themselves the Benaud trio. They played a new piece by David Lang called "The Tied Test". As a musical concept, it is possibly unique.

 

It was literally a Test match (the Brisbane Tied Test in 1960) set to music. It had four movements, one for each innings, with each over of the match corresponding to one bar of music. Moreover, each of the 22 players was represented by a small motif which was played while they were bowling (piano) or batting (violin, cello). The players explained a few of these motifs before the performance; they were linked to the players’ names, so “Richie Benaud” had four notes and “Alan Davidson” five, with rhythms similar to the spoken name. “Wes Hall” had just two notes, but played heavily to suit a fast bowler. I could not make out all 22 motifs, of course, but I am sure I heard “Norm O’Neill” frequently during the second movement. O’Neill of course scored 181 in the corresponding innings.

 

I had made a small contribution to this. David Lang contacted me a few months ago about his idea, and I supplied with all the statistical information I had on the Tied Test.

 

I regarded the music as a great success. It had a calypso flavour, and was much more accessible than typical modern music.

 

It was the first concert I have been to in 18 months, so was particularly memorable. It was a small venue, perhaps 100 seats, but was sold out. There was no social distancing. Masks were encouraged but not mandatory; about 20% of patrons wore them.

 

I must find out how the Benaud Trio got its name. The name is serious; the group has been around for 15 years and has won various chamber music competitions and awards.

 

There is a clip of the composer explaining the music at the link (I get a mention)

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/benaudtrio

 

 

 

 

 

********

 

 

I did an interview last week with Jack Snape of the ABC, discussing aspects of the history of cricket scoring. We covered a range of subjects and it was quite enjoyable. It is a bit unfortunate, though, that they focussed on that old Bradman four runs thing, an article that I wrote 13 years ago, and is old news.

 

https://www.abc.net.au/.../sir-don-donald.../100078546

 

For the record, I still stand by the analysis of Bradman. However, moving the mystery four runs (in the final Test of 1928-29) into the Bradman column is only one of a number of possible resolutions for the anomaly in the surviving scorebook, and I would concede it is not the most likely. It is still an open question, though.

 

 

*********

 

333 with no 3s

 

It’s a rather large and fiddly table, but for anyone interested here is a complete breakdown of scoring strokes for all Test triple (or should that be treble?) centuries. It’s fair to say that all such innings benefit from benign batting conditions, but how could it be any other way? If a batsman could score a triple under difficult conditions, what should he be capable of when the going is good?

 

There is quite a lot of variability in the composition of the strokes. This can reflect the speed of the outfield or the batting style, or both. It can be hard to unravel these factors. Undoubtedly, Chris Gayle benefited from a small ground and fast outfield when he hit 333 at St John’s Galle without hitting a three, but Gayle’s power hitting would also have played a part. Hayden hitting 380 with only one three was on a normal size ground, and this must be mostly a function of power hitting. Inzamam also hit a triple without any threes, but perhaps that was a sign of his disinclination towards quick running between wickets.

 

There is a quite a remarkable difference between the triples by Edrich and Cowper, made within months of one another. Edrich hit 57 boundaries and 3 threes, while Cowper hit 20 boundaries and 26 threes. Cowper’s 307 was scored on a large ground with extremely slow outfield: his fours included several that were all-run. One can speculate that Cowper’s innings might have been worth an extra 50 runs under the conditions enjoyed by Edrich.

 

 

Batsman

Runs

BF

Scoring strokes

6

5

4

3

2

1

Strokes/100 runs

BC Lara

400

584

214

4

1

43

4

25

137

54

ML Hayden

380

436

175

11

1

39

1

27

96

46

BC Lara

375

535

187

0

0

45

10

33

99

50

DPMD Jayawardene

374

573

208

1

0

43

4

24

136

56

GStA Sobers

365

579

205

0

1

38

6

30

130

56

L Hutton

364

855

211

0

0

35

15

18

143

58

ST Jayasuriya

340

577

195

2

0

36

2

23

132

57

Hanif Mohammad

337

187

26

16

40

105

55

WR Hammond

337†

401

157

10

0

34

3

22

88

47

DA Warner

335

417

168

2

0

39

7

26

94

50

MA Taylor

334

564

193

1

0

32

4

32

124

58

DG Bradman

334

445

158

0

0

46

6

26

80

47

CH Gayle

333

435

171

9

0

34

0

15

113

51

GA Gooch

333

483

170

3

0

43

2

15

107

51

MJ Clarke

329

468

165

1

0

39

8

26

91

50

Inzamam-ul-Haq

329

436

159

9

0

38

0

11

101

48

A Sandham

325

635

191

0

1

28

8

23

131

59

KC Sangakkara

319

478

165

8

0

32

1

16

108

52

V Sehwag

319

303

146

5

0

43

2

15

81

46

CH Gayle

317

484

170

3

0

37

2

17

111

54

Younis Khan

313

561

181

4

0

27

7

17

126

58

RB Simpson

311

740

193

1

0

23

8

28

133

62

HM Amla

311

528

172

0

0

35

5

24

108

55

JH Edrich

310

448

115

5

0

52

3

8

47

37

V Sehwag

309

374

140

6

0

39

3

16

76

45

RM Cowper

307

587

167

0

0

20

26

28

93

54

DG Bradman

304

462

145

2

0

44

1

15

83

48

KK Nair

303

381

164

4

0

32

2

19

107

54

Azhar Ali

302

469

177

3

0

23

3

35

113

59

BB McCullum

302

557

155

4

0

32

6

19

94

51

LG Rowe

302

428

154

1

0

36

4

27

86

51

 

†Hammond’s official score is, of course, 336 not out, but re-scoring the scorebook gives him 337 not out. I have used the latter so that the strokes add up.

 

Incidentally, the highest innings for which I do not have a full stroke breakdown is the next on the list – Bradman’s 299* at Adelaide in 1931-32.

 

********

 

 

26 March 2021

 

A Lost Century?

 

In the previous post I mentioned the discovery of scores from the 1909-10 M.C.C. tour of South Africa. I have now rescored these matches into ball-by-ball form and they have been posted in my online database here.

 

Robin Isherwood has provided more information on the source. The scorebook was the work of one Bernard de Rockstro Malraison (1844-1930), a long-time scorer in Transvaal. He had stood as an umpire in a match involving Major Warton’s team in 1888-89, but not in the Tests. He is not to be confused with his son W. de R. Malraison (1876-1916) who played for Transvaal a couple of times. The younger Malraison died fighting in the Great War, not in Europe but in East Africa, where there was considerable conflict between British and German colonials.

 

In the scorebook, the first three Tests are in the same hand, almost certainly Malraison himself. The scores are accurate and re-scoring was straightforward. The fourth and fifth Test scores, played in Cape Town, are in a different hand. The scorers are identified as W.W.A. Colson (1884-1941) and T.H.G. Lancellas (1874-1934). These later scores contain problems. They are almost certainly re-copies, and errors have crept in, some of them significant. For instance, in South Africa’s 103 in the final Test, there are 33 extras recorded. These extras, however, apply to England’s first innings of 417.

 

An unusual feature of newspaper reports of the final Test include statements that there was an error in the scoring of Aubrey Faulkner’s 99 in the second innings, and that he actually scored 100; it was said that one run had been mistakenly credited to Sinclair (37). And indeed, the re-score does give Faulkner an exact 100 and Sinclair 36. Unfortunately, it is not clear-cut. There are several anomalies that occur in the score during the innings; for example, Faulkner’s scoring stroke order in the batting score does not match the bowlers’ rescore analysis. So, uncertainty must remain; I would say, though, that when I tried a few possible changes to the bowling (which itself creates new anomalies), Faulkner still gets his 100.

 

Robin Isherwood also sent me a photo of Malraison with his scorebook, taken when he was 84 years old. It is rather charming and I will post it here…

 

 

********

 

A New Look at the ‘Slowest’ and ‘Quickest’ Bowlers

 

I have done a little exercise to look for the current bowlers who are fastest and slowest in getting through their overs. I was able to do this thanks to Benedict Bermange, who has over the years sent me quite a number of his linear Test scores with clock times at the start of every over. I have entered this data onto a spreadsheet for 22 recent Tests (since 2019, more than 7000 overs). Benedict only scores Tests involving England, but the 22 Tests involve all the major Test countries. Bowlers who did not play against England in this period are not covered.

 

I was inspired to do this by a comment from Benedict that Ishant Sharma seems to take an inordinate time to get through his overs. And sure enough, guess who tops the list of 67 'slowest' bowlers, and by a significant margin?

 

Bowler minutes per over

I Sharma 5.56

ST Gabriel 5.07

MA Starc 5.03

JL Pattinson 4.98

JJ Bumrah 4.90

AA Nortje 4.85

MA Wood 4.83

PJ Cummins 4.80

JR Hazlewood 4.69

Shaheen Shah Afridi 4.65

 

Times are given in fractions of minutes, not minutes:seconds.

 

The calculation only considers what I call 'standard' overs, or complete overs without interruptions. (Standard overs comprise about 82% of all overs.) Overs with wickets, reviews, drinks break, injuries etc are filtered out. Leaving them in doesn't affect the order much.

 

The bowlers who get through their over the quickest, based once again on uninterrupted overs, are

 

NM Lyon 3.50

S Nadeem 3.45

RL Chase 3.41

Yasir Shah 3.39

RRS Cornwall 3.34

JE Root 3.34

KA Maharaj 3.31

R Ashwin 3.23

JL Denly 3.21

AR Patel 3.17

 

Although Akshar Patel has the fastest standard over, he ranks only about 10th on an 'every-over' basis. This reflects the very high frequency of wickets that he has taken to date, which increase over times by about 1.5 minutes each time there is an interruption.

 

The qualification is minimum 25 'standard' overs. Benedict's clock times only go to the nearest minute, but when averaged out, more precision is possible.

 

I also looked at the effect of interruptions of various kinds on minutes taken to bowl an over.

 

 

All overs

4.43

Standard uninterrupted overs

4.16

Standard uninterrupted maidens

3.53

Overs with 10 or more runs

4.75

Over + Drinks

7.52

Overs with Review(s)

5.92

Injury

8.13

1 wicket falling

5.83

2 wickets falling

8.10

Standard pace

4.53

Standard spin

3.53

 

 

********

 

 

Most runs off 6 consecutive balls in Tests…

 

The record for a single over is 28, but three batsman have scored 29 off six consecutive balls spread across multiple overs:

Nathan Astle in
THAT 222 : 664166;

Adam Gilchrist 664616 during his famous Perth century;

Andy Blignaut 646661 at Cape Town in 2005.

Astle and Blignaut each hit sixes off their next ball.

 

*******

 

The player involved in run outs most times in ODIs is Mohammad Yousuf 79 times (run out 38 times, partners 41). Steve Waugh is on 78 (27+51) and on 76 there is Inzamam (40+36) and Sachin Tendulkar (34+42). Run out most times is Marvan Atapattu on 41 (+24 partners),while for partner run outs the record is Waugh (51, above).

There is uncertainty in some of the above figures for partners. I suspect that there are errors in fall-of-wicket batsman identifications in older matches. I have never checked the 'official' identifications in ODIs but I believe that some of them are guesswork. I have surveyed the equivalent data in Tests and found more than 400 errors in the 'official' online scores.

In ODIs, high numbers of run outs tend to occur with middle order batsmen who often bat with the lower order in the later overs. In these circumstances, run outs are often  less important than in earlier overs.

 

********

 

From Arnold D’Souza:

I recall from my "against each other for longest" article a few years ago that there were 16 years between the first and last times Venkat played a Test against Clive Lloyd - and almost 37 between that first match and the only one in which Venkat umpired and Lloyd refereed. Without checking, I'm fairly sure that must be the longest joint Test career - there are a few other pairs who both played in the same Test and umpired in the same one, but I can't recall any which involved a time span close to Venkat and Lloyd.

 

********

 

 

 

 

 

13 March 2021

 

Falling at the Last

 

Here is a list of batsmen who batted all day only to be out to the last ball of the day. I prepared this when I noticed that this fate had recently befallen two English batsmen in the space of only a few Tests. Almost 200 Tests had passed since the previous instance in 2016.

 

Batsman (final score)...number of runs, day, Test

 

H Sutcliffe(161)…141, day 3, Eng v Aus (5), The Oval 1926

CA Roach(209)…209, day 1, WI v Eng (3), Georgetown, Guyana 1930

Pankaj Roy(140)…140, day 1, Ind v Eng (2), Mumbai (Brabourne) 1951/52

Pankaj Roy(150)…120, day 5, Ind v WI (5), Kingston, Jamaica 1953

Waqar Hassan(189)…154, day 3, Pak v NZ (2), Lahore (Jinnah) 1955/56

Khalid Ibadulla(166)…166, day 1, Pak v Aus (1), Karachi (National) 1964/65

ED Solkar(67)…67, day 3, Ind v Eng (1), Lord's 1971

GM Wood(126)…126, day 4, Aus v WI (3), Georgetown, Guyana 1978

SM Gavaskar(115)…115, day 1, Ind v Aus (4), Delhi (FSK) 1979/80

MD Crowe(137)…123, day 3, NZ v Aus (2), Christchurch 1985/86

MH Richardson(99)…99, day 1, NZ v Zim (2), Harare 2000/01

MP Vaughan(177)…177, day 1, Eng v Aus (2), Adelaide Oval 2002/03

AN Cook(105)…105, day 1, Eng v WI (3), Bridgetown, Barbados 2015

TWM Latham(136)…136, day 1, NZ v Zim (2), Bulawayo (Queen's) 2016

JE Root(186)…119, day 3, Eng v SL (2), Galle 2020/21

DP Sibley(87)…87, day 1, Eng v Ind (1), Chennai (Chepauk) 2020/21

 

 

Qualifications: more than 50 overs in the day and the match had to continue next day after the batsman was out.

In the Solkar and Crowe cases, the team was all out, so it is very likely that the day’s play would have continued if the wicket had not fallen.

 

Of the above, only Waqar, Ibadulla, Gavaskar and Taslim were out to the last ball of an over, so presumably these are the only ones who knew they were facing the last ball of the day. This is not absolutely certain, since there could have been another over if they hadn't been out. However, in the Ibadulla and Gavaskar cases, it is known that no further overs could have been bowled.

 

********

 

Here are lists of the fastest and slowest Test partnerships, in terms of speed for the first 100 runs. The data is drawn from the ball-by-ball database, supplemented, where ball-by-ball data is absent, by research into original reports. Overall, time or balls faced information was found for the first 100 runs for about 95 % of century partnerships. Generally speaking, where data is absent, the partnerships were not remarkable in terms of speed (or lack of it).

 

In some cases, conversions had to be made between minutes and ball bowled, using over rates for the relevant innings. This creates a little uncertainty in the exact rankings in the following tables, particularly the first table where changes of only a couple of minutes could affect results.

 

The fastest times in minutes (and the slowest in balls bowled) are mostly from older Tests, played in the days of high over rates. By contrast, when it comes to fast partnerships in balls bowled, recent Tests dominate.

 

 

Fastest Test Century partnerships (1st 100 runs, minutes)

Wkt

Partn.

1st 100 (mins)

PGH Fender/GE Tyldesley

5

102*

38

Eng v Aus (4), Manchester (Old Trafford) 1921

AW Nourse/EA Halliwell

8

124

40

SAf v Aus (1), Johannesburg 1902/03

NJ Astle/CL Cairns

10

118

44

NZ v Eng (1), Christchurch 2001/02

DRA Gehrs/C Hill

3

144

46

Aus v SAf (1), Sydney (SCG) 1910/11

C Hill/W Bardsley

2

101

47

Aus v SAf (2), Melbourne (MCG) 1910/11

Misbah-ul-Haq/Azhar Ali

4

141*

47

Pak v Aus (2), Abu Dhabi 2014/15

M Morkel/AB de Villiers

10

107*

48

SAf v Pak (2), Abu Dhabi 2010/11

BB McCullum/CJ Anderson

5

179

48

NZ v Aus (2), Christchurch(Hagley) 2015/16

H Graham/AE Trott

8

112

49

Aus v Eng (4), Sydney (SCG) 1894/95

J Hardstaff jnr/CJ Barnett

3

104

49

Eng v NZ (1), Lord's 1937

EH Hendren/FE Woolley

3

121*

50

Eng v SAf (2), Lord's 1924

FR Brown/W Voce

7

108

50

Eng v NZ (1), Christchurch 1932/33

C de Grandhomme/HM Nicholls

5

124*

50

NZ v SL (1), Christchurch (Hagley) 2018/19

 

 

Slowest Test Century partnerships (1st 100 runs, minutes)

Partn.

1st 100 (mins)

Javed Omar/Nafees Iqbal

1

133

264

Ban v Zim (2), Dhaka 2004/05

JB Bolus/KF Barrington

4

119

237

Eng v Ind (1), Chennai (Nehru) 1963/64

AR Border/MJ Slater

4

104

234

Aus v SAf (2), Sydney (SCG) 1993/94

MS Atapattu/KC Sangakkara

2

109

231

SL v WI (1), Galle 2001/02

TR Gripper/A Flower

4

117

228

Zim v WI (1), Port-of-Spain, Trinidad 2000

Hanif Mohammad/Javed Burki

3

156

222

Pak v Eng (2), Dhaka 1961/62

JG Wright/KR Rutherford

2

100

222

NZ v Aus (3), Auckland 1985/86

MA Butcher/N Hussain

3

120

219

Eng v WI (2), Port-of-Spain, Trinidad 2004

Azhar Ali/Sami Aslam

1

131

219

Pak v NZ (2), Hamilton 2016/17

S Chanderpaul/DJ Bravo

5

100

218

WI v SAf (2), St Kitts 2010

BR Hartland/JG Wright

1

110

216

NZ v SL (1), Moratuwa 1992/93

 

 

Fastest Test Century partnerships (1st 100 runs, balls)

Partn.

1st 100 (balls)

NJ Astle/CL Cairns

10

118

55

NZ v Eng (1), Christchurch 2001/02

BB McCullum/CJ Anderson

5

179

58

NZ v Aus (2), Christchurch(Hagley) 2015/16

Misbah-ul-Haq/Azhar Ali

4

141*

64

Pak v Aus (2), Abu Dhabi 2014/15

C de Grandhomme/HM Nicholls

5

124*

66

NZ v SL (1), Christchurch (Hagley) 2018/19

AJ Stewart/AR Caddick

10

103

73

Eng v Aus (1), Birmingham (Edgbaston) 2001

M Morkel/AB de Villiers

10

107*

74

SAf v Pak (2), Abu Dhabi 2010/11

AW Nourse/EA Halliwell

8

124

76

SAf v Aus (1), Johannesburg 1902/03

SCJ Broad/GP Swann

8

108

77

Eng v Aus (4), Leeds (Headingley) 2009

BB McCullum/JDS Neesham

5

153

77

NZ v SL (1), Christchurch (Hagley) 2014/15

ML Hayden/A Symonds

5

124

80

Aus v SAf (2), Melbourne (MCG) 2005/06

GC Smith/HM Amla

2

178

80

SAf v Aus (3), Perth (WACA) 2012/13

F du Plessis/AB de Villiers

6

102

80

SAf v Aus (3), Perth (WACA) 2012/13

 

 

Slowest Test Century partnerships (1st 100 runs, balls)

Partn.

1st 100 (balls)

RH Catterall/B Mitchell

1

119

465

SAf v Eng (1), Birmingham (Edgbaston) 1929

Alim-ud-Din/Hanif Mohammad

1

122

457

Pak v Eng (2), Dhaka 1961/62

JB Bolus/KF Barrington

4

119

455

Eng v Ind (1), Chennai (Nehru) 1963/64

Hanif Mohammad/Javed Burki

3

156

449

Pak v Eng (2), Dhaka 1961/62

KWR Fletcher/G Boycott

3

101

402

Eng v WI (5), Port-of-Spain, Trinidad 1974

Waqar Hassan/Hanif Mohammad

2

165

400

Pak v Ind (3), Mumbai (Brabourne) 1952/53

B Mitchell/IJ Siedle

1

127

392

SAf v Eng (5), Durban (Kingsmead) 1930/31

DCS Compton/L Hutton

3

150

391

Eng v WI (3), Georgetown, Guyana 1954

 

None of the partnerships in the final category would rival the partnership of 98 by Sardesai and Manjrekar at Bridgetown in 1962, which occupied close to 590 balls and 248 minutes.

 

I may add these lists to the Unusual Records section.

 

 

********

 

Andrew Samson has come up with some ‘new’ Test match scores, found at the Johannesburg Wanderers ground. They are from a handwritten scorebook, by a gentleman named Malraison, that has somehow survived the years. It contains, among other things, full scores for all five Tests of the 1909-10 M.C.C. tour of South Africa, Tests that were previously lost.

 

Breakthroughs like this have become rare, made even more difficult by the restrictions related to the Covid virus. So this is a great find, and Andrew has kindly already supplied me with copies. I will re-score it into ball-by-ball form in due course.

 

Credit to Robin Isherwood, who alerted me to the existence of this book, and the possibility of it containing Test match scores, 15 months ago. It took a sustained effort by Andrew to get access to the book.

 

 

********

 

 

 

The responsibility for calling no balls in internationals has now been fully handed over to the third umpire. The change was introduced when Test matches re-commenced in England last July. In 18 Tests since then, there have been 199 no balls called. In the previous 18 Tests, when the calls were left to on-field umpires or referrals, there were only 77 no balls.

 

This is quite a significant change!

 

********

 

Most runs by a batsman off a single bowler in an ODI… at the SCG in the 2015 World Cup, AB de Villiers (162*) scored 76 runs off JO Holder. Note: this was NOT de Villiers' record-breaking 100 in 31 balls innings.

 

 

********

 

Carl Hooper took 568 balls to progress from 99 Test wickets to 100, spanning three Tests in 2001.

********

 

(As of end of January) In the last 19 Tests, only one has been won by the team winning the toss. Three draws and 15 losses. In the sole victory (NZ v Pak at Christchurch) the team winning the toss (NZ) chose to bowl. It certainly does fluctuate. In the previous 19 Tests, there were 11 wins to the team winning the toss, and 5 losses. Back in 2018 there was a sequence of 13 consecutive wins to teams winning the toss.

 

********

 

How did underarm bowling really work?...

 

Before about 1750 cricket bowling was literally bowling, that is all along the ground. Lumpy Stevens, it is said, invented ‘length’ bowling.

 

I don't really know about the specific actions, but according to Barclay's World of Cricket A-Z, most bowling before 1800 was "medium to fast". A bowler named Lamborn was the first off-spinner. From 1777, a bowler named Noah Mann was "giving a curve to the ball the whole way".

 

About 50 years ago my club played a game against a team of blind cricketers (legally blind, but most could see a bit). The ball was made of wicker with a bell in it, and the bowlers bowled underarm. You had to pitch the ball in the first half of the pitch, and the ball, ringing, would bounce several times. The bowlers had a run up and sent the ball down surprisingly fast. The stumps were bright orange (for those who could see a bit) and had a bell attached which the keeper would ring to orient the bowler and assist returns from the fielders. We did sometimes help fielders who couldn't find the ball when it stopped moving.

 

They absolutely thrashed us, as I recall. Certainly the most memorable cricket match of my youth.

 

 

********

 

The Australia/India series really went down to the wire, with the series result very much in the balance going into the last hour of the last Test. I couldn't find any precedents in series of 4 or more Tests, where the final Test produced a result.

It has happened occasionally with 3-Test series. In 2013-14 in South Africa, Australia won the final Test with 6.4 overs left, to take the series 2-1.

 

In West Indies in the same season, New Zealand won the final Test with 13.4 overs left, to take the series 2-1.

 

********

 

Highest innings in Tests that were both unbeaten and completely chanceless…

 

Lara's 400* contained 'technical', 'half-' or 'possible' chances only.

 

Warner's 335* against Pakistan last year was chanceless but there was one DRS and he was caught off a no ball on 236.

 

In the DRS era, Adam Voges 269* against West Indies was chanceless and there were no reviews or run out attempts.

 

Javed Miandad's 280* against India in 1982-83 was chanceless. All other unbeaten innings higher than this prior to 2000 are known to have included chances of some description.

 

********

 

Usman Shinwari of Pakistan has played in 17 ODIs but has faced only seven balls in his four innings. His one and only scoring shot was a first-ball six off Marcus Stoinis in 2019. He was out next ball.


********

7 February 2021

 

Dropped Catches Report 2019-2020

 

I have updated the survey of dropped catches in Test matches to include matches up to the end of 2020. As I have reported in the past, the list is created by searching Cricinfo’s (vast) ball-by-ball texts for mentions of missed chances, searching for up to 40 terms (or euphemisms) that are used to indicate chances. This usually whittles the texts down to about 100 ‘hits’ per Test, which I then read through to identify real chances.

 

The continuous survey goes back to late 2001, plus some Tests from the previous 12 months. The first two or three years have gaps, in that the texts sometimes lacked the necessary detail. (I also have very patchy data on Tests from the 1920s to 1990s from other sources, which I have reported on elsewhere.)

 

I have combined the data from 2020 with 2019 since the number of matches in 2020 was so limited. Overall, 24.1% of chances were missed in this period, including missed stumpings but not missed run outs (run outs are not searched). This represents 6.26 missed chances per Test. Since 2002, the average rate has been 25.6%, so 24.1% represents a better than average year from the fielders’ perspective; However, the rate was higher than 2018’s 22.6%, which was the lowest recorded.

 

Overall the rate from 2002 to 2010 was 26.0%; from 2011 to 2020 it was 24.9%. This indicates a gradual, if slight, improvement in catching. This appears to be an extension of a long-term trend; data from earlier decades, where available, indicated rates of 27-30%.

 

The data breakdown for the various countries is shown in the table. Overall, South Africa has had the best catching record, although there are signs of decline in the most recent data. For some years, South Africa had Boucher keeping wickets and Graeme Smith at slip; both of these players had outstanding catching records, as did AB de Villiers.

 

Recent improvement in catching by Pakistan is quite striking and appears to be sustained. Is it something to do with the UAE grounds?

 

All (2002-2020)

2018

2019 + 2020

South Africa

21.4%

20%

25%

New Zealand

21.7%

19%

23%

Australia

22.4%

20%

22%

England

25.5%

24%

24%

India

26.0%

20%

26%

Sri Lanka

26.0%

24%

22%

West Indies

28.3%

24%

27%

Zimbabwe

28.9%

Pakistan

29.0%

21%

20%

Bangladesh

33.3%

34%

31%

 

 

The usual caveats apply to this data. Chances described as “half”, “technical” and “academic” are included. Whether or not an incident counts as a missed chance can be a matter of opinion; I do think, however, that up to 90 per cent of chances would be agreed by nearly all observers. The data also depends on the completeness of the Cricinfo texts and the efficiency of the search. It would be nice if the Cricinfo commentators would use a single indicator phrase to flag misses; they often use DROPPED in upper case, but there are many exceptions that have to be uncovered by deeper searching.

 

As for bowlers who have suffered the most, it is a two-horse race. Jimmy Anderson is currently on 122 and Stuart Broad 120, well ahead of Harbhajan Singh on 99. Note that Tests this year have not been covered. Spare a thought for Pakistan spinners Danish Kaneria and Saeed Ajmal, who have suffered drop rates of 39 and 40 per cent respectively off their bowling. Spinners often have higher rates because many of their chances are caught and bowled or short leg, or ‘reaction’ wicketkeeper catches.

 

Alastair Cook completed his career with 78 missed chances off his batting, a number that will take some beating. Sangakkara and Sehwag are next on 67; Sehwag’s miss rate as batsman of 37 per cent is the highest among major batsmen.

 

Cook is also the ‘leading’ fielder, missing 81 chances, or 32 per cent. He spent a lot of time fielding at short leg, where catching is difficult and often a matter of luck.

 

A more detailed article on this subject from 2016 is here.

 

 

********

 

Did Bradman know he needed just four runs in his last Test, to average 100?

 

Bradman said he didn’t, in unambiguous terms:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51s7Sgt1SY&fbclid=IwAR3bp64y3rNEEVKKEKnYWUxFXUrgesg6Rg1Fv1ieckyAl3KShKLoFLOufjU

 

But did anyone else know in advance? There is no apparent evidence.

 

Looking at Trove, I could not find any mention of Bradman needing four runs to average 100 in any of the match previews just before the Test. Some previews mention him needing 83 runs to reach 2000 for the English season, and 674 (on the rest of the tour) to reach 10,000 career f-c runs in England.

 

Bradman's 6996 runs, and his average as it stood of 101.39, can be found in isolated reviews of the fourth Test in the Newcastle Morning Herald and in the Melbourne Herald. Even this doesn't seem to have been widely noticed, and the implications for the final Test were not discussed. It’s worth noting that anyone pondering the question in advance would have presumed that The Don would be batting twice at The Oval, in which case he would have needed 104 runs (if he was out twice).

 

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/140342748?searchTerm=bradman%206996#

 

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/247298602?searchTerm=bradman%20average

 

By the end of the fifth Test, Bradman’s shortfall had been noticed in multiple publications. Even before the final day, an article in the Brisbane Courier-Mail remarked that Bradman was four runs short. It was evident at that point that Bradman was not going to bat again, as England was going to lose by an innings and plenty.

 

It is interesting that some sources at the time were reporting Bradman's career average as 89.7. That was his average against England. There was still widespread opinion in those days that the only 'real' Tests were Ashes Tests.

 

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/49918364?searchTerm=bradman%20average

 

 

********

 

 

 

 

 

Here is some data concerning the percentage of batsmen out ‘clean’ bowled versus 'played on'. I have conducted a little survey of the last 100 Tests, to come up with some figures.

 

(Caveats: this depends on the accuracy of the Cricinfo texts and my ability to interpret them.)

 

Total out bowled: 554

Hit bat first: 121

Hit pad/body first : 24

 

Some (not quantified) hit both the bat and the pad.

 

Bonus stat...

 

Batsmen bowled offering no stroke = 26. This includes some cases where the batsmen tried to withdraw the stroke but the ball hit the bat anyway.

 

It would also be interesting to know how many batsmen are playing on to balls that would not have hit the stumps, but that is not feasible with text data.

 

 

********

 

Bowlers on debut whose first two balls were hit for four, a very short list…

 

Roy Gilchrist 1957

Dinusha Fernando 2003-04

Navdeep Saini, SCG 2021

 

I was surprised that I couldn’t find any more cases than this in the database.

 

 

*******

 

9 January 2021

 

A few notes on the origins of ‘hat-trick’

 

I was looking at various sources that discuss the origin of the term. They have a tendency to either repeat one another, or sometimes contradict one another without explanation. I decided to look to see if there are some truly original sources to be found.

 

The concept of a hat-trick is said to have its origins when HH Stephenson took three wickets in three balls in a match in 1858, and was presented with a new hat for his troubles. However, the term ‘hat-trick’ (or ‘hat trick’) doesn’t seem to appear in print in newspapers until 1865, in the Chelmsford Chronicle in Essex.

 

hattrick1865

 

This reference is mentioned in Wikipedia. I did my own search of the British Newspaper Archive, and found this independently; it was earliest reference that I found.

 

The Stephenson 1858 link to hat-tricks has been reported many times. I was curious about sources, and tracked down the actual origin match, an Eleven of All England v Twenty-Two of Hallam and Staveley at Hyde-park, Sheffield on 6, 7 and 8 September 1858. The Eleven was a team of professionals touring around England; the inimitable Julius Caesar was in the team. Stephenson’s triple hit occurred on the last day, as recorded in the Sheffield Daily Telegraph.

 

stephenson1858

 

There are a couple of interesting elements to this original report. Firstly, that the presentation of a hat was already a “custom” in this team, as long as the three wickets occurred in the same (four-ball) over, and secondly, that Stephenson was not actually presented with a hat after all! His trick was spread over two overs, and so did not qualify for a hat, but it was sufficiently noteworthy for the team to present him with a guinea (21 shillings) presumably after a whip-round. It is not clear how many, if any, hats had previously been awarded through this ‘custom’. Hat-tricks were uncommon even then, and we are talking about just one team.

 

But as we have seen, the actual term ‘hat-trick’ was not yet in use. We can see where the ‘hat’ comes from, but why ‘trick’? Searches show that the term was already in use in reference to magicians and magic shows, and this may have rubbed off on cricket.

 

A search of Trove in Australia turns up quite a few occurrences of the term in the early to mid 1870s, but always in relation to magic. The first Australian cricketing reference is found in December 1877. The hat-trickster was Harry Boyle, and he was indeed presented with a new hat! This took place during an early match on the epic 1877-1878 tour by the Australian XI, playing against 22 of Newcastle in New South Wales.

 

hat trick

 

 

Perhaps the term, and the custom of presenting a hat, was brought to Australia by Shaw’s team earlier that year. However, it doesn’t seem to have been applied during Shaw’s matches: perhaps there were no actual hat-tricks. There are a few occurrences in 1876-77 for phrases like “three wickets in three balls”, but all are in minor matches not involving the tourists, with no mention of hats.

 

 

********

 

Note the UPDATE below on the subject of international cricket broadcasts.

 

 

 

A further note on the use of air transport: the 1938 Australian touring team to England actually had a clause in their contracts that air transport would not be used. The first use of air transport for a cricket tour came in 1946, when the Australian team flew to New Zealand. Australian tours to England continued to travel by ship up to 1964 (which went part of the way by air); the 1968 team travelled entirely by air to Britain.

 

Earlier comments

 

********

 

At Port-of-Spain in 1960, Frank Worrell was caught on the boundary (one-handed) by Fred Trueman, but umpire Jordan signalled six. It is not clear what the umpire thought had happened, but Worrell ‘walked’ and averted any controversy.

 

********

 

It is unusual to come across ‘significant’ errors in the standard online Test data sources (Cricinfo /Cricket Archive), but here are a couple from 1993…

 

At Moratuwa (Sri Lanka) Jonty Rhodes in the second innings scored 101* off 204 balls, not 107 balls. The Wisden Book of Test Cricket says 193 balls, but that applies to Rhodes reaching the century, not his final BF.

 

At the Gabba later that year, Richard de Groen’s innings of 3 is given as 3 balls and 5 minutes, even though his last-wicket partnership with Tony Blain was worth 40 runs. De Groen actually faced 30 balls and batted 55 minutes.

 

********

 

In the third Test of 1993-94 against Sri Lanka at Ahmedabad, Sachin Tendulkar, at age 20, was the Indian vice-captain. Tendulkar took on the on-field captaincy duties on the fourth day when Mohammad Azharuddin was indisposed. Has any player younger than this (20.79 years to be exact) ever taken on captaincy duties, even in an acting capacity?

 

The youngest confirmed named captain was Tatenda Taibu, who was 21 when he captained Zimbabwe in a couple of Tests. (Rashid Khan was supposedly younger, but I do not regard dates of birth from Pakistan and Afghanistan to be reliable.)

 

 

********

 

17 December 2020

 

About four years ago I posted a list of the best head-to-head bowling averages for bowlers, specifically when bowling to the best batsmen – those with batting average over 45. A reader, Arjun, suggested that I try a similar exercise for batsmen against the best bowlers. To do this I had to decide on some criteria for deciding who the best bowlers were. I came up with the following:

 

-       Bowlers with 200 Test wickets, or 150 before 1970, or 100 before 1940.

-       All other bowlers with 25 or more wickets and a bowling average under 30.

 

Bowlers meeting these criteria have taken about 35,000 wickets, representing about half of all wickets taken by bowlers. This divides the bowlers neatly into two similar-sized sets.

 

Not surprisingly, most batsmen’s averages against the ‘top bowlers’ are lower than their career averages. It is not always the case, however. Typically, the top bowler average is about 87% of career average. I would say this is a smaller effect than I would have expected.

 

Anyway, here are the batsmen with the best averages against top bowlers…

 

Top Bowler Avge

Runs off Top Bowlers

Career Runs

Career Bat Av

75.5

DG Bradman

2115

6996

99.94

58.0

CL Walcott

2030

3798

56.69

57.7

EdeC Weekes

1845

4455

58.62

54.4

GStA Sobers

3099

8032

57.78

54.1

WM Lawry

2650

5234

47.15

52.1

IVA Richards

3440

8540

50.24

50.8

Inzamam-ul-Haq

3505

8830

50.17

49.8

KC Sangakkara

4727

12400

57.40

49.5

MJ Clarke

5103

8643

49.10

49.5

BC Lara

6139

11953

52.88

49.3

L Hutton

2270

6971

56.67

49.3

SPD Smith

3202

7227

62.84

48.3

MEK Hussey

2946

6235

51.52

48.0

JL Langer

3747

7696

45.27

47.9

SR Tendulkar

6656

15921

53.78

47.6

Javed Miandad

2668

8832

52.57

47.4

AI Kallicharran

1754

4399

44.43

Minimum 1000 runs against top bowlers

 

So Bradman’s 99.94 comes down to 75.5 when facing the best bowlers of his time. This is thanks to the efforts of bowlers like Hedley Verity and Alec Bedser, who did well against The Don. Next come a few West Indians, whose averages were little affected by facing top bowlers: I can’t really explain this except to note that Tests in the West Indies in the 1950s were a graveyard for many top bowlers.

 

Prominent batsmen who did not meet the 1000 run threshold but did very well against top bowlers include Graeme Pollock (68.4) and George Headley (55.7). A curious case is Andrew Jones of New Zealand, whose top bowler average is 56.4, which is 127% of his career average of 44.27, the highest (and most counterintuitive) percentage for any batsman. Wasim Raja had a similar percentage (career average 36.16, top bowler average 46.0).

 

I’m not sure what more to make of this. Why some batsmen do better against good bowling than bad bowling is puzzling. Perhaps others can make more of this than I can.

 

 

********

 

The One-Year Wonder

 

Some notes I made years ago on fast bowler Ted McDonald. I thought I might as well post them…

 

Warwick Armstrong certainly seemed to prefer his fast men bowling from the same end taking turns, rather than bowling in partnership. Sometimes McDonald had to shoulder a bigger burden: if Gregory had scored runs, Armstrong would cut back his bowling duties for a few hours thereafter.

 

While they usually opened together, it appears that Gregory and McDonald, as a pair, never took the second new ball together (available after 200 runs in those days). Generally, Gregory would take the new ball, with someone like Kelleway or Hendry at the other end.

 

McDonald's entire Test career fitted into one calendar year (1921), in which he took 43 wickets. No other bowler with such a short (single-year) career ever took so many wickets; in fact no one is even close.

 

When Armstrong bowled his famous two overs in a row after an abortive declaration by England at Old Trafford, McDonald probably should have bowled the intervening over. It was reported that the umpires ignored calls from the crowd that the wrong bowler was preparing to bowl. The score presents a puzzle here: I am pretty sure that McDonald bowled only 30 overs, not 31 given in official scores, in that innings.

 

McDonald twice dismissed batsmen by breaking their bats. At Leeds, McDonald broke A Ducat's bat. The splinter hit the stumps while the ball was caught by Gregory, and the batsman was given out caught. At Johannesburg, McDonald broke the bat of JW Zulch, the splinter hitting the stumps and he was given out hit wicket. I know of no other case of a batsman being out in this way.

 

Batting at The Oval, McDonald thought he was out bowled (by Parkin) and left the crease, but was recalled by the England captain Lionel Tennyson, who felt that the wicketkeeper had dislodged the bail.

 

There is a picture of Tennyson batting one-handed against either Gregory or McDonald at Leeds (the other bowlers he faced would have had the keeper at the stumps). Tennyson hit a five off McDonald in this innings, and (amazingly) two fours off Gregory and a six over square leg off Mailey.

 

tennyson one handed

 

**********

 

The first ever international cricket broadcast?

 

I came across this snippet from the 1931 England/New Zealand series. It is not 100% clear to me what form this broadcast took…

 

1931phone

 

UPDATE: Peter Huxford in the UK has sent me some links to New Zealand reports of these broadcasts, found on the Papers Past website. It appears that the broadcasts were after-play match reports, and they began with the first Test of the 1931 series. The broadcasts, some of which were relayed through Sydney, were sometimes unsuccessful. It seems that they were attempting shortwave broadcasting; very ambitious in those days considering the distances involved.

 

It is also evident (from newspaper radio guides) that receivers in New Zealand were able to pick up conventional Medium Wave broadcasts from Sydney and Melbourne at that time. They must have had good aerials, but it was quite feasible, especially if there was ‘clean air’, where frequencies were uncluttered by competing stations. Radio reports of the 1930-31 Australia/West Indies series were received in New Zealand.

 

It is curious that shortwave broadcasting to Australia was not attempted for the 1934 Ashes series; the ‘synthetic’ broadcasts using telegraphed information were preferred. In 1938 the synthetic broadcasts were still being used; shortwave technology was improving but reportedly still unreliable. (The ABC, incidentally, did not invent synthetic broadcasts – they had been used in 1930 by Australian commercial radio stations.)


In 1939, shortwave broadcasts of the Tests in England were being received in the West Indies. The Jamaica Daily Gleaner even turned some of this into (extensive) published text.

 

 

********

 

 

 


In the climactic Oval Test of 1926, play was interrupted by “the moving shadows on the wicket from advertising kites.” This worried the English batsmen, apparently.

 

********

 

Sreeram asked: John Reid hit four sixes before lunch on Day 1 at Calcutta, 1964-65. Has anyone else done that ?

A:Most sixes before lunch on the first day…

 

5 Gayle at Basseterre v India 2006

4 Blackwood at Kingston v India 2016

4 Hayden at Chennai v India 2001

 

Blackwood was batting at #5 !

 

The Reid one is not in the database and was a surprise to me; so there could be others, although it seems very unlikely in older Tests.

 

The most in any single session is 9 by Hammond and Astle. You can guess in which Tests.

 

UPDATE: Gayle’s 5 sixes were actually hit in the second session of the match, the first having been rained off.

 

 

********

 

Update on the 1961 video. (see 18 October)

 

John Leather writes to say that the BBC did have video machines from 1958 onwards. However, the Ampex machines cost $70,000 each and the tapes were so expensive and few in number that they were used only for short-term storage. Editing these tapes was not practical.

 

Long-term recording of footage was primarily done with kinetoscopes (also known as telerecording), which converted the image as displayed on a monitor onto conventional film. The 1961 Ashes footage was archived and stored in this way.

 

Telerecording  continued through the 1960s even as videotape technology improved. Tapes were wiped and reused even for important shows like Doctor Who and At Last the 1948 Show, a 1968 precursor to Monty Python. It is fortunate, perhaps, that permanent copies of Monty Python were kept.

In Australia, telerecording was widely used well into the 1970s. Surviving footage of the 1971-72 ‘World XI’ series, some of which has made its way to YouTube,  was undoubtedly made using this method.

 

 

********

 

 

 

21 November 2020

 

 

Timeline of India’s Famous Win, 3rd Test Port of Spain 1976

 

This was an important match historically. Not only a great win for India, but a turning point for the West Indies, who, after this humiliation, always played for keeps, with the fast bowlers offering no quarter. In the following Test at Kingston, the short-pitched bowling was given free rein, and India eventually crumbled. It was the start of a dominant era for the West Indies.

 

 

Mins

Ov

Runs in 1 hr

 

58-0

55

15

 

Tea

 

69-1

73

 

 

Gaekwad out 28

 

101-0

120

35.4

43

 

134-1

177

50

33

Stumps day 4

169-1

225

 

 

100 partnership in 151'

175-1

237

69

41

Drinks

177-2

247

 

 

Gavaskar out 102

197-2

297

87

22

Lunch

223-2

357

104

26

Drinks, New ball

289-2

417

118